Millcreek Canyon, Utah

I biked 2 hours or longer from the house to the trailhead of Millcreek Pipeline Trail. I took a different route that didn’t include Parley’s Trail. I ended up using the roads and neighborhoods to get up making my own way that seems easier than Parley’s.

I finally made it up to the trailhead with a few stops of biking up the canyon to the trail parking. There was a lonely car parked in a shaded area and then myself as I rode in looking for a place to park and lock the bike up. Biking to a trail isn’t what most people do and I am sure what trail maintains and the city think of people doing when heading to a trailhead. If people are biking they are typically MTB and or driving and parking.

So be aware, if you are like myself you will have to get creative with locking your bike up. 🙂

I fixed my bag and bladder and hose for the water with how I wanted it situated for the hike took my helmet off and took out my hat for the hike and started off. The beginning of the trail is wide and at around 4 p.m shaded which is how I like my trails to be. There was also a fairly good incline with many rocks of all sizes and shapes and some tree roots sticking out as well. This of course is what you will get on the side of a mountain.

I had a slow go at the beginning part of the incline until I reached my first switchback and from there either my legs got used to it or the incline wasn’t nearly as bad. I finally reached the top of the trail with a sign indicating to either turn left for the Pipeline Overlook or turn right for Grandeur Peak Trail.

I chose left since it was only 1 mile and felt if I was still wanting to on the way back that I could hike the 2 miles for the Grandeur Trail.

As I hiked it was nice and quiet except for a few yelps of exhalations that surprised me until I finally came up on the soul as he zipped passed me with his thanks and good wills.

I hiked the pipeline heading towards the overlook when realizing that it would be less shaded and that it was mostly just a lookout point for the city.

When I hike I mostly like getting away from the city, I like to be up in the trees, back in the canyon away as much as I can be from civilization for as long as I can be. The views are certainly nice and I do enjoy those but I just want quiet that you can only get from the rustle of small animals in the thickets and the sounds of birds singing.

I went through Alltrails and the comments for this trail and the rating. There were comments a low ratings for people not liking the trail for one reason or another. Yes, the trail is steep getting to the main trail but then it levels off and its not so bad. At different times of the day and seasons shade will either be plenty or hardly none at all.

Does anyone else find it odd that we rate nature like we rate ourselves?

I reached back to the trail post and kept going straight along towards Grandeur Trail. For a good hour or so I mostly had the trail to myself once again coming along another mtb as he zipped passed me in both directions. As I was getting closer to the Grandeur Trail post I started seeing more people along the trail. It’s been awhile but I forgot how friendly trail people are the mtb, runners and hikers. Everyone greets everyone as you pass by, encouraging one another.

I finally made it to the Grandeur Trail head which had a nice stream and a couple dogs playing in the water as I got up to the stream everyone else had cleared out so I went over for a few to relax by the water and try out a wrap for keeping your neck cool while hiking and etc.

I have been wanting to do the Grandeur Peak all summer but with the time nearing passed 7 and still needing to bike back home I turned around and hiked back along the trail. The hike back all I seemed to be able to think about was a nice cold acia bowl. Thankfully everything is down hill and the trail just ‘gently’ pushes you off the mountain all the way into Sugarhouse were I stopped at Aubergine & Company.

with love,

jess

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